Continuing Sysgen discussion

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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Fri 07 Dec 2012 21:59

Just a hypothetical question, but what about a moon with a substantial atmosphere like Titan orbiting a SJ? If such a moon were warm enough it might be a place where life could evolve.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby Crucis on Fri 07 Dec 2012 22:16

AlexeiTimoshenko wrote:Just a hypothetical question, but what about a moon with a substantial atmosphere like Titan orbiting a SJ? If such a moon were warm enough it might be a place where life could evolve.


If it were warmer, it wouldn't be what it is. IIRC, it has lakes of liquid methane, etc. If it got warmer, the methane would turn into gaseous methane, among other things. Also, Titan's atmosphere is 98% nitrogen. I'm no exobiologist, but it seems like if life is going to evolve on Titan, it would have to do so in the environment as it currently exists, because who knows what Titan would be like if it was significantly warmer.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Fri 07 Dec 2012 22:32

Gaseous methane is a potent greenhouse gas. Start warming those lakes to the point where they release the methane into the atmosphere and you could have a place where anaerobic life could thrive. My larger point is to take a moon with an atmosphere containing enough CO2 and have it warm enough where it could be seeded with plants to produce an oxygen-nitrogen atmosphere over time.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby Crucis on Fri 07 Dec 2012 22:36

AlexeiTimoshenko wrote:Gaseous methane is a potent greenhouse gas. Start warming those lakes to the point where they release the methane into the atmosphere and you could have a place where anaerobic life could thrive. My larger point is to take a moon with an atmosphere containing enough CO2 and have it warm enough where it could be seeded with plants to produce an oxygen-nitrogen atmosphere over time.



Possible, I suppose. (Though true terraforming really is outside the scope of the game.)
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Fri 07 Dec 2012 23:07

I agree with the true terraforming. It would take far too long for the effects to be noticeable. On a planetary evolution scale it's similar to how complex life evolved on earth. I wouldn't be surprised if we found anaerobic life on Titan or Europa in the next couple of decades.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby Vandervecken on Sat 08 Dec 2012 02:07

Just note that there is Oxygen locked in frozen H2O under Titan's surface. That ice at that temperature is as hard as any granite on our own planet. And there is a possibility that due to interaction with Saturn (Gravitational Flexing) that just like some other moons that there might be a spot deeper under the surface where that H2O might be a liquid. Hydrocarbons, liquid water, and a bit of energy, if they can mix a bit we have possibly an interesting situation.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sat 08 Dec 2012 06:52

Exactly. Although in Titan's case it may be another 5 billion years before it gets warm enough for things to get interesting.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby Crucis on Sun 09 Dec 2012 19:54

Ok, I'm bouncing back to the inital topic in this thread, the planetary mass table.

Here's the table I've put in the manuscript.


Mass 0: moons and planetoids
Mass 1: small rocky planets (less than 0.1 Me) (Mercury)
Mass 2: mid-sized rocky planets (0.1 to 2.6 Me) (Earth and Venus)
Mass 3: large rocky planets (2.7 to 10 Me)
Mass 4: small gas/ice giants (11 to 30 Me) (Neptune and Uranus)
Mass 5: mid-sized gas giants (31 Me to 1 Mj) (Saturn and Jupiter)
Mass 6: large gas giants (greater than 1 Mj)

NOTE: Me = Earth mass, Mj = Jupiter mass

And I've added a die roll for Gas and Ice Zone planets. This is where that currently stands...

Gas Zone

Roll 1d10
1: Mass 1 Type B
2: Mass 4 Type G
3-8: Mass 5 Type G
9-10: Mass 6 Type G


Ice Zone

Roll 1d10
1: Mass 1 Type F
2: Mass 2 Type F
3-9: Mass 4 Type I
10 Mass 5 Type I


I'm assuming that things work a little differently in the Gas and Ice Zones, though mostly just for yucks. Any input is welcome.

Also, I'm thinking that the # of Moons die roll modifiers for mass 4-6 will be: +2 for mass 4, +4 for mass 5, and +6 for mass 6. This is, of course, on a 1d10 based table, not 1d100. (I'm trying to use 1d10 rather than 1d100 when it's reasonable and possible to simplify things.)
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sun 09 Dec 2012 20:33

Coupled with all of the oddities that we've been discussing, the tables look good so far.
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Re: Continuing Sysgen discussion

Postby Crucis on Sun 09 Dec 2012 21:28

Someone mentioned earlier the possibility of Mass 6 Gas Giants having planet sized moons.

I think that I'm going to avoid that complication, and only all it to happen in a "large moon/twin planet" situation, which I may move into the sysgen oddities process, and probably only for cases when the twin might be habitable. I don't want the confusion of pooling some planet sized Type B "large moon/planet" with a bunch of normal moons. Better to leave well enough alone.
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