Rare Star Systems

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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Fri 07 Dec 2012 22:58

Gamma-1 Leonis is a K1-IIIb orange giant.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby Crucis on Fri 07 Dec 2012 23:14

The next thing I have in mind to work in parallel with Rare Star Systems is a set of sysgen "oddities" (for lack of a better term) that would be used to tweak newly generated "normal" star systems (not the Rare ones, and not starless nexuses) to make them less cookie cutter. I'll create a separate thread for those when I've compiled the list.

Unlike the oddities in Ultra and Solar's optional rules section, these oddities will be highly specific to system generation, and will NOT be self-contained systems of their own. It's my intention that they be applied to ALL "normal" star systems, though one of the entries will be "change nothing".
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sat 08 Dec 2012 07:26

I like the idea that every system has the chance to be unique.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby Dawn Falcon on Sat 08 Dec 2012 08:37

Let's see...

* Neutron stars - can be formed by supernovas, so a nebula is certainly possible.
* Proto-Star System - The sort of energy levels here mean WP's would need to be well out from the stars, Probably maser nebulas, or ones with the flare special from Cosmic - space is very "dirty" inside star nurseries, and there are high-energy phenomena at work.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sat 08 Dec 2012 21:08

What about late B main sequence stars. No planets and under 1 LM diameter. Give them a slight bonus on their wp roll due to mass. The Rigel B spectroscopic binary is a good example.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby Crucis on Sat 08 Dec 2012 21:31

AlexeiTimoshenko wrote:What about late B main sequence stars. No planets and under 1 LM diameter. Give them a slight bonus on their wp roll due to mass. The Rigel B spectroscopic binary is a good example.


I don't really want to be splitting spectral classes this way, unless I go whole hog with the full spectral subclass PFZ table. Admittedly, late B types would seem to have less of a # of WP's die roll modifier than the standard. But then again, the "standard" for the Blue Giant star types is far closer to B than O, simply because B type stars are vastly more common than O type stars, regardless of luminosity class (1 in 3 million for O types vs 1 in 800 for B types). I simply say that Type O's are part of the BG type, just so that they show up on the star type table.

Of course, given that the standard assumption of 3E WP's and star types is that WP's are attracted to stars of greater mass, and given the truly great mass of O type stars, they could exist by themselves on the star type table at 1% separate from B type stars. But then the problem becomes what differentiates the two classes enough to justify separate star types? The combined BG type (which is really just B types) is already a +4 modifier on a 1d10 # of WPs table. Splitting off the O type stars would almost require something like a +6 or greater modifier, if not an automatic WP junction. But then I'd have to consider whether RSG's come from Type O or Type B ancestors. (I think that I'd assume that hypergiants have Type O ancestors.)

Honestly though, I think that it's too much detail for such a low percentage (i.e. only 1%) on the star type table.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby Crucis on Sat 08 Dec 2012 22:45

Dawn Falcon wrote:Let's see...

* Neutron stars - can be formed by supernovas, so a nebula is certainly possible.
* Proto-Star System - The sort of energy levels here mean WP's would need to be well out from the stars, Probably maser nebulas, or ones with the flare special from Cosmic - space is very "dirty" inside star nurseries, and there are high-energy phenomena at work.


I think that you meant Ultra or Solar. ;)

I can't speak to stellar nurseries, but I thought that once a star entered its T Tauri stage, the accompanying "solar nebula" or accretion disk was blown away and a mostly clean system was left behind, not counting all the rocks and such that still have to coalesce into planet or asteroid belts. Also, I'm a bit wary of emission and maser nebs in this proto-system scenario because I want the planet types to be "hard coded" by the proto-system rare system description, and not affected by the nebula. OTOH, after looking at the type changes caused by Emission and Maser nebs, I don't think that they'd have any serious impact on what I had in mind for the proto-system.


EDIT: In the article I've read, there's no mention of high energy levels or whatever associated with T Tauri stars during that phase of planetary formation, and also from what I've read, it sounds like the protoplanetary accretion disk has been blown away or disperse. So I'm left wondering where a maser nebula fits into the mix here.


After some reading on the subject, I get the impression that gas and ice giants form before rocky planets. Thus, I was going to have the Type G's and Type I's in place, along with their moons, while the rocky zone was going to be nothing but asteroid belts. I was going to use the White star type (spectral class A) PFZ's (which are VERY different from those in Ultra and Solar, which are very wrong), and have all of the asteroid belts be type aH, which conforms to what they'd be in either an emission or maser neb. I hadn't decided on moon types, but that detail doesn't matter that much to me. In the end, all the usable real estate is going to be asteroid belts and moons. Some extreme, some desolate. The two interesting details I was considering was that there'd be a higher than average number of planetoids in the rocky zone belts, since the belts are trying to coalesce into planets at this point, and that the belts would be much wealthier than average. Perhaps automatic Very Rich or better. (They might be thought of as "dense AB's" as described in the sysgen oddity.)

This could be a rather nasty place, but with a nice income potential for a star system with no habitable worlds. Definitely a miner's paradise! The entire star system is a gigantic strip mine.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sat 08 Dec 2012 23:13

Crucis wrote:The two interesting details I was considering was that there'd be a higher than average number of planetoids in the rocky zone belts, since the belts are trying to coalesce into planets at this point, and that the belts would be much wealthier than average. Perhaps automatic Very Rich or better. (They might be thought of as "dense AB's" as described in the sysgen oddity.)


Based on what I'm reading on Wikipedia, I would treat the T Tauri rocky zone AB's to have 1d5 moon sized objects to represent the planetary embryos.

Crucis wrote:I don't really want to be splitting spectral classes this way, unless I go whole hog with the full spectral subclass PFZ table. Admittedly, late B types would seem to have less of a # of WP's die roll modifier than the standard. But then again, the "standard" for the Blue Giant star types is far closer to B than O, simply because B type stars are vastly more common than O type stars, regardless of luminosity class (1 in 3 million for O types vs 1 in 800 for B types). I simply say that Type O's are part of the BG type, just so that they show up on the star type table.


I see your point on this. For the sake of argument I would put the late B main sequence in with the A's to represent stars greater than 2 solar masses but not large enough to go supernova.

Crucis wrote:But then I'd have to consider whether RSG's come from Type O or Type B ancestors. (I think that I'd assume that hypergiants have Type O ancestors.)


RSG's tend to have masses from 10-20 times Sol's. They probably started as B class. The hypergiants do seem to have started a O class. Some of the most massive may never go through the Red Hypergiant phase before they collapse to black holes or blow as a hypernova.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby Crucis on Sat 08 Dec 2012 23:30

AlexeiTimoshenko wrote:
Crucis wrote:The two interesting details I was considering was that there'd be a higher than average number of planetoids in the rocky zone belts, since the belts are trying to coalesce into planets at this point, and that the belts would be much wealthier than average. Perhaps automatic Very Rich or better. (They might be thought of as "dense AB's" as described in the sysgen oddity.)


Based on what I'm reading on Wikipedia, I would treat the T Tauri rocky zone AB's to have 1d5 moon sized objects to represent the planetary embryos.


I traded thru wiki and found what youo were likely reading about planetesimals and protoplanets. Protoplanets may be called "moon-sized", but they're not moon-sized by my definition. They're more planetoid sized. They use the examples of Ceres, Pallas, and Vesta, all AB "planetoids" with only Ceres coming close to Cosmic's definition of moon.

And given that their populations would be pooled anyways, it's probably not going to matter much in the long run. Besides, staying with planetoids allows me to avoid creating an exception to how asteroid belts are working.



Crucis wrote:I don't really want to be splitting spectral classes this way, unless I go whole hog with the full spectral subclass PFZ table. Admittedly, late B types would seem to have less of a # of WP's die roll modifier than the standard. But then again, the "standard" for the Blue Giant star types is far closer to B than O, simply because B type stars are vastly more common than O type stars, regardless of luminosity class (1 in 3 million for O types vs 1 in 800 for B types). I simply say that Type O's are part of the BG type, just so that they show up on the star type table.


I see your point on this. For the sake of argument I would put the late B main sequence in with the A's to represent stars greater than 2 solar masses but not large enough to go supernova.[/quote]

Well, yeah, perhaps late B-types seem closer to A-types, but I don't think that the difference is enough to be worrying about.



Crucis wrote:But then I'd have to consider whether RSG's come from Type O or Type B ancestors. (I think that I'd assume that hypergiants have Type O ancestors.)


RSG's tend to have masses from 10-20 times Sol's. They probably started as B class. The hypergiants do seem to have started a O class. Some of the most massive may never go through the Red Hypergiant phase before they collapse to black holes or blow as a hypernova.


I noticed that HG's apparently need to come from stars with a min mass of 25 Ms, which puts well into the O-type.
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Re: Rare Star Systems

Postby AlexeiTimoshenko on Sat 08 Dec 2012 23:42

Crucis wrote:I traded thru wiki and found what youo were likely reading about planetesimals and protoplanets. Protoplanets may be called "moon-sized", but they're not moon-sized by my definition. They're more planetoid sized. They use the examples of Ceres, Pallas, and Vesta, all AB "planetoids" with only Ceres coming close to Cosmic's definition of moon.


I was reading the Protoplanet article. It says that the embryos tended to be Ceres to Pluto sized objects. Some were smaller like Pallas and Vesta, but most seem to fit the game's definition of moon. Of course you just need to have the star system be a few million years younger for your version to fit.
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