Art!

Fiction by Sylvester Wrzesinski

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Art!

Postby Xveers on Sun 05 Mar 2017 04:41

So, while I've been dealing with a multitude of things in real life, one of the things I've been working on for the deWulf universe has been ironing out various other details of my universe. One of those really vexing things is "how do things look?" And let me tell you, that can be a challenge. Getting a single image done takes no small amount of time, and any number of additional odd little details that need to get done. There's a lot of difference between a written description of a uniform, and how it actually looks. Especially a description that's part of a story!

Image

First in a chain of images done in support of my deWulf Universe! Done by the wonderful blu3dawn14.deviantart.com, this picture features Able Spaceman (rank name provisional) Linden, of the dWS Hauptmann. (If the image is cut off, please right click on it and choose "view in new tab").

We have him in three seperate uniform styles as seen in the deWulf navy. Common across all three uniforms are the Navy badge on the left shoulder, and his unit badge on the right shoulder. Nametag is always found on the left breast, and on the light dress and worksuit he has his main qualification badges on his right breast. The three qualification badges are for Electrical Engineering, Communication Systems, and Mechanical Engineering respectively. The purple flashing and highlighting on his worksuit and skinsuit indicate his status as part of the engineering crew.

On the left is the light dress uniform, a rather classical suit and tie. This uniform is often seen at dress occasions and general usage planetside. This uniform is NOT recommended for use aboard ship or station due to its multiple loose bits of clothing and complete inability to protect against vaccum.

In the center is the worksuit, standard uniform while in space. It is a much more form fitting bit of clothing, and indicates his department (purple for engineering), as well as still retaining his certification badges. In an emergency, engineer Linden can put on "boots and bubble", a generic set of mittens that seal at the wrists, footcovers that seal at the ankle, and an unwieldy bubble helmet that seals down at the neck (the tail gets pinched at the base to try and protect the wearer). While this provides SOME protection against vaccum, it's intended only to protect the wearer long enough to get to pressurized compartments.

Finally, to the right is the skinsuit. This is a suit designed for short to middling length work in vaccum. These suits are produced to a rough template, but are usually custom-fit to make them comfortable for longer term use. Fully sealed from neck downwards, most crewmembers take a while to get used to how their tails have to be curled in to a pouch in the lower back. Early experiments in having a "third leg" for the tail proved to be one of those good ideas that didn't quite work, as fitting a tail backwards into the suit took far too long and always proved to be unwieldy. The helmet includes a built in communications system and resperator. Storage vacoules in the suit store waste and provide an hour of air independent of hookups to other systems. The helmet also has a built in HUD that can interface with most tools, making repairs and maintenence easier by relaying the readouts in a clear, easy to read format.
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Re: Art!

Postby southwestforests on Sun 05 Mar 2017 14:06

Xveers wrote: Early experiments in having a "third leg" for the tail proved to be one of those good ideas that didn't quite work, as fitting a tail backwards into the suit took far too long and always proved to be unwieldy
I would also think distracting with sensation of a bunch of fur pushed the wrong way. Yes, curled in a pouch sounds a bit more tolerable.
Except maybe if one sits on it?
You raise a good point, how best is a tail to be cared for?
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Re: Art!

Postby Xveers on Sun 05 Mar 2017 16:41

southwestforests wrote:I would also think distracting with sensation of a bunch of fur pushed the wrong way. Yes, curled in a pouch sounds a bit more tolerable.
Except maybe if one sits on it?
You raise a good point, how best is a tail to be cared for?


After several trials, the settled upon method was simply to curl the tail up into a pouch that sits in the small of the back. Though this does have the effect of giving a "husky tail" kind of effect. It's awkward, but it's better than the other alternative. An added bonus of the back-pouch is it gives an additional air reserve and a bit of much-welcome padding (at the expense of effectively sitting on your limb).

The other option is one that's much, MUCH older, culturally speaking, and that is simple amputation. Docking has been a kind of cultural rebellion thing as much as a somewhat needed medical procedure since sharp knives were a thing. Since it's not strictly required, only really devoted and "hardcore" spacers go through with it. About the only group that has it as a requirement are the "Ahle", orbital drop troops. Their heavy power armour is simply incompatable with tails (and believe me, they TRIED to get around that). So all of them get docked as part of training.

Now of course this also means there's a bit of a cultural thing with others wanting to mimic them and show off how tough they are by following in their footsteps. Depending on their competence, they're viewed either as well-meaning poseurs, or hopped up morons with an overinflated sense of self. The former tend to get some good natured ribbing (and that's about as gentle as you'd expect from a crossover between real-life marines and paratroops). The latter tend to get the stupid beat out of them.
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Re: Art!

Postby southwestforests on Sun 05 Mar 2017 21:06

Ah. Oh man, docking hadn't even crossed my mind. Power armor situation odes make sense.
I don't know how it would be with life evolved to this point but for our 4 foot friends both canine and feline their tails are so much a part of their communication system; especially for felines like the one on the critter not getting shoved out of my way right now - ears and tails independently and together relay a lot of information. And, honestly, I wouldn't mind having a cat tail. Georgie's is nearly prehensile at times. :D
On the up side to tail docking is not having to worry about injury to it.
But, dang, that's a serious decision to have to make.
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Re: Art!

Postby Xveers on Sun 05 Mar 2017 22:03

southwestforests wrote:
On the up side to tail docking is not having to worry about injury to it.
But, dang, that's a serious decision to have to make.


Yeah, it's not an easy decision. But on the flipside, you get to stomp around in a suit of armour upwards of half a metric ton of F-you, with enough armour to shrug off small arms fire and enough firepower to make apartment buildings rubble fields.

You're also the first guys to drop onto a hostile LZ though. But that's just one of those "target rich environment" things :twisted:
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Re: Art!

Postby Xveers on Thu 09 Mar 2017 03:00

Image

Second in a chain of images done in support of my deWulf Universe! Done by the wonderful blu3dawn14.deviantart.com/, this picture features Hunter (Analagous to Captain) Wilson, of the dWS Hauptmann.

We have him in two seperate uniform styles as seen in the deWulf navy. Common across both uniforms are the Navy badge on the left shoulder, and his unit badge on the right shoulder. Nametag is always found on the left breast, and on the light dress suit he has his main qualification badges on his right breast. The two qualification badges are for Navigation and Laser Gunnery respectively. The blue flashing and highlighting on his worksuit and skinsuit indicate his status as part of the command crew.

The dWS Hauptmann is the lead class of a new plasma cannon armed destroyer, and as such specializations for her weapons have not yet been worked out (as of the time of this photo). Hunter Wilson thus carried over his Laser Gunnery badge when he was promoted from Junior Hunter (XO) of the dWS Liese Meitner, a Hawking-Class Light Cruiser.

On the left is the light dress uniform, a rather classical suit and tie. This uniform is often seen at dress occasions and general usage planetside. This uniform is NOT recommended for use aboard ship or station due to its multiple loose bits of clothing and complete inability to protect against vaccum. Even so, most Hunters tend to wear it as the bridge is usually one of the last compartments on the ship to lose pressure, and the loss of the bridge is generally followed quickly afterwards by the loss of the ship.

To the right is the skinsuit. This is a suit designed for short to middling length work in vaccum. These suits are produced to a rough template, but are usually custom-fit to make them comfortable for longer term use. Fully sealed from neck downwards, most crewmembers take a while to get used to how their tails have to be curled in to a pouch in the lower back. Early experiments in having a "third leg" for the tail proved to be one of those good ideas that didn't quite work, as fitting a tail backwards into the suit took far too long and always proved to be unwieldy. The helmet includes a built in communications system and resperator. Storage vacoules in the suit store waste and provide an hour of air independent of hookups to other systems. The helmet also has a built in HUD that can interface with most tools, making repairs and maintenence easier by relaying the readouts in a clear, easy to read format. A Hunter's suit contains additional command links, allowing functional (if basic) command of the ship even with the failure of the preferred command consoles. This photo also shows the Extended Endurance pack. Attached to the back, the EE pack provides additional life and power support, dramatically extending the survability of the wearer.
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Re: Art!

Postby southwestforests on Thu 09 Mar 2017 13:32

Xveers wrote: Storage vacoules in the suit store waste and ...

Brings to mind a couple things I'm looking at while passing time, without getting involved in a project causing me to be late, to leave for orthopedic appointment.
From November;
http://www.space.com/34690-nasa-space-poop-challenge-for-spacesuit-potty.html
"Future missions may require long-duration waste management for use by a pressurized suited crew member," NASA wrote in a statement on HeroX, a website where people or organizations can host incentive-based competitions.

"In the event of cabin depressurization or other contingency, crew members may need to take refuge in their launch and entry suits for a long-duration: 144 hours," according to the statement. "The crew member will have less than 60 minutes to get into and seal their spacesuit. To ensure the crew member's safety, the solution [proposed system] needs to take no more than five minutes [to set up and integrate with the spacesuit]."

Further complicating the challenge is the requirement that the system work in microgravity, in a pressurized spacesuit. This means would-be designers need to contend with floating water and debris that everybody really, really wants to keep far away from human orifices or vital spacesuit systems.


http://science.howstuffworks.com/question544.htm
How do astronauts function in their space suits for hours at a time?
...
Despite the advanced technology of the EMU, the "mechanics" used to meet the astronaut's basic needs of food, water, and waste elimination are surprisingly "low tech."
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Re: Art!

Postby southwestforests on Thu 09 Mar 2017 13:46

Xveers wrote:The helmet also has a built in HUD that can interface with most tools, making repairs and maintenence easier by relaying the readouts in a clear, easy to read format. A Hunter's suit contains additional command links, allowing functional (if basic) command of the ship even with the failure of the preferred command consoles.

And that is one of the cool things Starfire has which some other long running genres' technology do not use.
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Re: Art!

Postby Cralis on Thu 09 Mar 2017 13:54

southwestforests wrote:And that is one of the cool things Starfire has which some other long running genres' technology do not use.


It is my understanding that certain long running sci-fi shows and movies intentionally stay away from stuff like this to both lower production costs and to keep the characters "more human" so they will appeal to a broader audience. It's part of the reason I don't particularely care for them.

I think they are missing that what it means to be human will change with changes in science. There are some books, shows, and movies I really like _because_ they understand and show this. Gibson's books, Snow Crash, the Expanse series, Star Carrier series and Semper Fi trilogy of trilogies by Ian Douglas, and Charles Gannon's Caine Riordan series all come to mind when I think of stories that highlight this.
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Re: Art!

Postby southwestforests on Thu 09 Mar 2017 14:27

Cralis wrote:It is my understanding that certain long running sci-fi shows and movies intentionally stay away from stuff like this to both lower production costs and to keep the characters "more human" so they will appeal to a broader audience.
I've read where the makers of some shows and movies have said that outright. There is a need for the actors' faces to show. For various reasons there is a whole bunch of current sci-fi both visual and print which I am not aware of. I have read online and in books and seen in online video, the construction of space suit helmets for movies and shows. Built in lighting is a need - and finally air circulation is becoming universal! At least one show even provides for cooling in space suits.

EDIT: Some videos recently watched.
No, I have not seen the show and likely never will, there can not be a television set in my home, for various reasons.
https://youtu.be/QXwe51lkJ6M?list=PLW_o ... rNwA0N7A9k
Adam Savage Examines the Props and Spacesuits of The Expanse!
Published on Feb 1, 2017

https://youtu.be/-fJoWSOYn6U?list=PLW_o ... rNwA0N7A9k
Adam Savage Explores the Costumes of The Expanse!
Published on Jan 31, 2017

In my own, non-Starfire sci-fi universe one nation's military is pretty liberal about hair styles - as long as you can get your hair inside an emergency vacuum suit helmet in the regulation time, and you hair does not interfere with your job or equipment, there is wide latitude.
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