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Black Holes

PostPosted: Wed 10 Apr 2019 09:13
by Whitecold

Re: Black Holes

PostPosted: Tue 16 Apr 2019 06:01
by aramis
Technically, not a photograph. No camera.

A mathematically constructed image taken from observational data.

The project lead discusses the process here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGL_OL3OrCE

There's a LOT of data massaging happening. It's no less synthetic than the Mars DEM maps. Yes, the data is real, the image is accurate, but it's not actually a photograph; you wouldn't see that if you were close by it. (In part, because the image is from wavelengths we cannot see.)

Re: Black Holes

PostPosted: Tue 16 Apr 2019 08:54
by Cralis
A “simulated image” I believe is what they called it. In many ways that makes it even more amazing!

Re: Black Holes

PostPosted: Wed 17 Apr 2019 00:51
by aramis
Cralis wrote:A “simulated image” I believe is what they called it. In many ways that makes it even more amazing!

Agreed...

Visual interferometry CAN be a photograph ... it can be done "in camera" as it were ... but given the method...

The attention to bias is also interesting. As is that they're training neural nets to collate the data in place of people. They've even sent some groups bogus data to make certain that the results of the process aren't biased towards what was expected.

200+ people, 20 countries, 11 radio-scopes¹...

:twisted: Essentially, proof that a datagroup should be able to use a bigger detection range than a single set of sensors... :twisted:

¹ graphic on John Michael Godier's Event Horizon, ep "This is the "First Image of a Black Hole With Dr. Feryal Ozel" (released 16 Apr 2019 on YouTube.)

Re: Black Holes

PostPosted: Wed 17 Apr 2019 13:00
by Cralis
The three days of observation and weeks of processing might not work for tactical planning or targeting solutions :D

Re: Black Holes

PostPosted: Thu 18 Apr 2019 03:51
by aramis
Cralis wrote:The three days of observation and weeks of processing might not work for tactical planning or targeting solutions :D


The data feed is actually reduced for closer/higher-angle targets.

The process took so long on this one because they were proving the tech, and because it's about as extreme a case as can be done with current tech.

Interfereometry at Keck was nearly real-time.